3 Books I Read in 2017: Worth Their Weight in Gold

I decided to take a page from my buddy Rohan Rajiv’s playbook, and reflect on the books I read this year that really resonated with me. They are:

1. Inspired: How To Create Products Customers Love by Marty Cagan: This book is about nine years old, but it still totally nails the contemporary issues that product managers (PMs) face. What should be the nature of the relationship between product management and marketing teams? What about product management and engineering? How can PMs really understand customers, assess new opportunities, or recruit development partners? It’s all addressed in this book from a very practical perspective. There’s a new edition out that came out this month which I’m definitely looking forward to reading.

2. Daring Greatly: How The Courage To Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent and Lead by Brene Brown: Since I watched her insanely popular TED video, I’ve become a huge fan of Brene Brown and her work around vulnerability. This books dives into how to use vulnerability in key aspects of our daily lives, just like the title says :). A key learning for me was that having the courage to be vulnerable is not a sign of weakness; it is a sign of strength. Also, a popular but counterproductive way for us to deal with our shame is to look for and judge people doing worse than us in that area of our lives (parenting is a great example). Finally, when we take the time to reflect on the reasons why we feel shame, we usually realize that things aren’t as bad as we think. Great book!

3. Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time by Jeff Sutherland and JJ Sutherland: Most product teams today build their products using some variation of scrum, which makes this book quite relevant as  it addresses how to get product development right using scrum. The book contains lots of good war stories about the scrum-adoption journey of very different organizations (I really liked the FBI Sentinel story), but the key insight for me was that great product teams are autonomous, cross-functional, empowered and goal-oriented.

That’s it! Cheers to a New Year, and to continuous learning!

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